Amanda Kloots Shares Emotional Message After Husband Nick Cordero's Death

Just a day after Nick Cordero's death from COVID-19 complications, wife Amanda Kloots put on a brave face and told social media that she's attempting to reflect on the "silver lining" as she mourns with her family.

In a slideshow of footage of the family over the last month, the fitness trainer went deep into her thoughts to recognize the importance of her loved ones. "How do you get through the hardest time in your life? Family," Kloots wrote in the Instagram caption of the 11-minute clip.

“I woke up to this video my sister made for me. She titled it, The Silver Linings. I have always been lucky to have a family that loves to be together and to support each other. I’m even luckier to have Nicks family and extended family that are the same,” she continued. “This video captures these last 95 days. The love, the exhaustion, the bonds, the smiles, the song, the exercise, the hard work, the care, support and most of all love. They did all of this for Nick, Elvis and I- selfless time from their lives to be with us. In times of trauma, look for the silver linings.

It was announced on Sunday that the Broadway star had passed away due to his lengthy complications with the respiratory virus. He has been in the hospital for over 90 days. He was 41. “God has another angel in heaven now. My darling husband passed away this morning,” Kloots declared on the social media platform. "He was surrounded in love by his family, singing and praying as he gently left this earth. I am in disbelief and hurting everywhere. My heart is broken as I cannot imagine our lives without him. Nick was such a bright light. He was everyone’s friend, loved to listen, help and especially talk. He was an incredible actor and musician. He loved his family and loved being a father and husband. Elvis and I will miss him in everything we do, everyday."

Photo: Getty Images

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