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Mickelson in the Morning

People are always asking me for recommended reading lists. Ok. These are my Seven for Summer.

 

 


1. “The Making of America” by  Cleon Skousen.       This is my “smart book.”   It matches Madison’s notes taken during the Constitutional Convention with the final product.  If you wish to know of their original intent,  this is your first stop.

2. “Defending the Declaration: How the Bible and Christianity Influenced the Writing of the Declaration of Independence” by Gary Amos.      It’s the how and why the DOI is part of the organic law of the USA,  a treasure trove of ammo.

3. “When in the Course of Human Events: Arguing the Case for Southern Secession” by  Charles Adams.   If the mere reading of the subtitle of this book makes you feel queasy, then, you’ve been worked over and for you, this book will be an eye-opening elixir.   As usual, it’s “follow the money”. 

4. “A Disease in the Public Mind: a new understanding of why we fought the Civil War” by  Thomas Fleming.    This is a cautionary history and a warning against today’s mindless political invective which infects our culture 24/7.  The din amongst our chattering class, social media, our culture’s cultural troll factory, makes this generation’s civil discourse almost impossible.   A similar “disease” then,  took us from trash talk to real bullets.

5. “The Politics of Guilt and Pity” by Rousas J. Rushdoony.    He wrote,  “…the human race, in apostasy from God, is deeply involved in a rebellious claim to autonomy and in the guilt which follows that claim.”    The tactics of the welfare state are laid bare, and made silly.    

6. “The Christian Prince: Putting ‘Civil’ Back into Civil Government”,  by Buddy Hanson.   This is a vigorous antidote to both Machiavelli and Alinsky.   The old truism,  “…you can’t beat something with nothing…”  is answered with vigor.

7. “From Tyndale to Madison: How the Death of an English Martyr Led to the American Bill of Rights”  by Michael Farris.    Just chasing the footnotes of this rich and inspiring history should keep you busy for a long time.

 

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